Academic Writings

December, 2015
These intercollegiate societies are significant agents of socialization for the initiates and constitute unprecedented and, in some cases, controversial influence. As a large component to my inquiry, I discern the values, practices, and norms of these Greek societies and thusly question the meaning of its inclusion on college campuses. My findings shed light on a system that practices ritualistic and somewhat archaic ceremonies within a contemporary environment that breeds a form of exclusive commitment for the members in ways that are both individually beneficial and sometimes controversial. The moral codes and activities practiced by Greek institutions are tantamount, if not parallel to tribes and cultures of completely different ways of life, and objective, ethnographic perspectives such as the methods I practice in research, warrant this comparison that is typically inconspicuous to non-Greek initiated college students, and the Greek members themselves.
December, 2015
Looking back on neoliberal institutionalism, interstate relations are maintained by mutual efforts of support and aid. The illusion of benefit and national security for the United States is generated from the many interest groups and political action committees in Washington with immense lobbying power. Israel seems to support the United States in order to ensure the reciprocated (albeit disproportional) military aid. Despite the asymmetry, the support exists on both sides and is further justified by the US and the Knesset to have strategic and moral imperatives. That interstate reciprocity upholds the tenets of neoliberal institutionalism but, given the masked intentions and lobbying power of ideological interests, the internationally ­recognized human rights violations committed by Israel, and the amount of US foreign aid to Israel, it draws on a wider, paradoxical picture that can fit within the frame of constructivism.